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The cold paw: Russian scientists set up ‘Yeti’ institute


 

Russia sets up university institute to study the yeti after spate of sightings

 

Yeti: Sightings are on the rise in Siberia

Yeti: Sightings are on the rise in Siberia

Russia is setting up a university research institute to study the Yeti after a spate of claimed recent sightings in Siberia.

Scientists say they have found 15 witnesses in the past year who gave statements that they saw the Abominable Snowman in one remote area .

‘We spoke to local residents’, said Dr Igor Burtsev, who conducted an expedition last summer and will head the new institute at Kemerovo State University. ‘They told us Yetis were stealing their animals.’

The academic claims around 30 Yetis live in a remote region of Mount Shoria in in southern Siberia.

He strongly denies accusations that the ‘sightings’ are a bizarre ruse to attract tourists to the far-flung region.

Reports say the two-legged creatures are heavy-set, more around 7ft tall and resemble bears.

‘Their bodies were covered in red and black fur, and they could climb trees,’ said one account.

One villager, Afanasy Kiskorov, even claimed to scientists that he rescued a Yeti on a hunting trip a year ago.

The creature was screaming in fear after falling into a swollen mountain river, he said.

His version suggested a ‘strange creature, looking like a huge man which tried several times to get out of water and to stand up on both feet, but dropped into the water each time and was howling’.

As his fellow-hunters ‘froze’ in amazement, Kiskorov held out a dry tree trunk.

‘The creature clutched to it and crawled to the bank,’ he said.

On the trail: Scientists believe there could be a community of up to 30 yetis existing in remote Russian wilderness

On the trail: Scientists believe there could be a community of up to 30 yetis existing in remote Russian wilderness

The Yeti allegedly then ran off.  This ‘sighting’ was in the Tashtagol district of the Kemerovo Region, only accessible by helicopter.  However, no photographic evidence exists.

Other accounts say the Yetis steal hens and sheep from remote villages.

According to Burtsev, Yetis are Neandethal men who have survived to this day

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‘In Russia there are about 30 authoritative scientists who are engaged in studying the phenomenon of the ‘Abonimable Snowman’. All of them will be

integrated into this institute,’ said Dr Burtsev.

The ‘primary goal’ is to ‘establish contact’ with one of the creatures.

Leading Russian scientists deny the existence of the Yeti. An expensive Soviet expedition in central Asia found traces but no clear proof of the existence of the Yetis.

Elusive: An artist's impression of the Yeti or Abominable Snowman

Elusive: An artist’s impression of the Yeti or Abominable Snowman

The cold paw: Russian scientists set up ‘Yeti’ institute | Mail Online

March 22, 2011 Posted by | Animals, Blog, Blogroll, Entertainement, Funny, Internet, nature, scams, Si-Fi, Space, Weird | | Leave a comment

Blog Promotion | BlogUpp!


Blog Promotion | BlogUpp!.

March 21, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

‘A great chance for a party’: Grandmother, 90, weds toyboy, 73 proving it’s never too late for love


 

‘A great chance for a party’: Grandmother, 90, weds toyboy, 73, proving it’s never too late for love

By Daily Mail Reporter

A couple whose relationship has ‘blossomed’ since meeting seven years ago have finally tied the knot – with a combined age of 163.  

Betty Erskine, 90, met her ‘toyboy’ Robin Tremayne, 73, in 2003 when the pair lived in the same retired accommodation block.  

The pair regularly chatted and later started seeing one another romantically, before Robin moved in and popped the question in 2009.

Loved-up: Betty Erskine, 90, and her toyboy Robin Tremayne, 73, have finally tied the knot - with a combined age of 163 - after meeting seven years ago

Loved-up: Betty Erskine, 90, and her toyboy Robin Tremayne, 73, have finally tied the knot – with a combined age of 163 – after meeting seven years ago

The couple married in front of friends and family at Exmouth Town Hall, Devon on Saturday. Betty and Robin will go on a honeymoon in this country later this year.

Robin said: ‘I love Betty and it just seemed the right thing to do.

‘I know it might be unusual to marry out our age but it’s not unheard of and it was just a natural progression of our relationship.

‘I thought we may as well get married – we get on so well. We never argue and agree on practically everything so it seemed like the right thing to do.’

The pair met when they were living in separate flats at Trafalgar Court retirement home in Uffculme, Devon.  

Robin, whose wife died in 2004, would regularly pop his head in and check on Betty and as time went on the relationship grew until two years ago when Robin proposed they marry and move in together.

Retired transport manager Robin added: ‘I lived on the top floor and Betty on the ground floor and she used to sit in the window and we would chat when I walked by.’

Now the couple live together in Exmouth, Devon, where Robin is Betty’s registered carer.

Happy couple: Henry Kerr and Valerie Berkowitz (pictured here on their wedding day) became Britain's oldest newlyweds last year with a combined age of 184 years

The accolade of being Britain’s oldest newlyweds goes to Henry Kerr and Valerie Berkowitz (pictured here on their wedding day). They had a combined age of 184 years when they married in 2010

Around 25 friends and family attended the ceremony at Exmouth Town Hall on Saturday, where Betty celebrated her 90th just weeks earlier.  

Former dinner lady Betty said: ‘The wedding was a great chance to have another party.
‘It just seemed right. We always agree and never fall out. He’s patient with me and looks after me and that’s all a girl wants really.’

The marriage is the third for both of them, after both divorcing and outliving their second partners.  

Betty has two daughters, a son and six grandchildren and Robin has a son, daughter three grandchildren and four great grandchildren.

But despite the couple’s advanced ages, they still have some way to go to earn the accolade of being Britain’s oldest newlyweds.

That distinction goes to 97-year-old Henry Kerr and 87-year-old Valerie Berkowitz with a combined aged of 184 who married in July last year.

From the: | Mail Online

March 21, 2011 Posted by | Blog, Blogroll, CELEBRITY, Entertainement, Health, nature, People | , , , | Leave a comment

Knut dead: German polar bear dies in front of 600 visitors at Berlin Zoo.


 

Knut is dead: Beloved polar bear collapses and dies in front of 600 visitors

By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 5:56 PM on 19th March 2011

 

Knut, the world-famous polar bear, collapsed and died in front of 600 visitors at Berlin Zoo this afternoon.

The bear rose to stardom when he was hand-raised by zoo keepers after being rejected by his mother at birth.

Bear keeper Heiner Kloes from the zoo said the four-year-old was alone in his compound. He says the cause is not yet clear.

‘He was by himself in his compound, he was in the water, and then he was dead,’ said Mr Kloes. ‘ He was not sick, we don’t know why he died.’

knut the bear is dead

Bear keeper Heiner Kloes from the zoo said the four-year-old was alone in his compound. He says the cause is not yet clear

A post mortem will be conducted on Monday to try pinpoint his cause of death, he said.

Berlin Mayor Klaus Wowereit called Knut’s death ‘awful’.

‘We all held him so dearly,’ he told daily newspaper B.Z. ‘He was the star of the Berlin zoo.’

polar bear dies

Knut with the keeper Thomas Doerflein who cared for him when the bear’s mother rejected him. Mr Doerflein died of a heart attack three years ago

Birthday boy: By the time of his first birthday in December 2007, Knut had already become an international celebrity

Birthday boy: By the time of his first birthday in December 2007, Knut had already become an international celebrity

The polar bear rose to global fame after he was rejected by his mother when he was born in captivity on December 5, 2006. The fluffy cub was shown to the public 15 weeks later, and attendance at the zoo has roughly doubled since, officials said.

The resulting ‘Knutmania’ led to a 2007 Vanity Fair cover with actor Leonardo DiCaprio shot by famed photographer Annie Leibovitz.

Though the zoo has never released exact numbers, Knut merchandise including postcards, key chains, candy and stuffed Knuts have brought in hundreds of thousands of euros.

Although Knut was the first polar bear to be born and survive at Berlin Zoo in more than 30 years, his tragic young life was blighted by tragedy from the start.

Both he and his twin were rejected by their mother at birth and his unnamed brother died four days later.

But Knut amazed medical staff at the zoo by clinging to life. After spending his first 44 days in an incubator, he was put in the care of zoo keeper Thomas Dörflein, who began raising the infant with round-the clock care.

News of the cub’s miraculous survival was picked up by the world’s media and the young cub became the zoo’s top attraction.

But tragedy struck again before Knut’s second birthday in 2008, when Mr Dorflein died of a sudden heart attack at the age of 44.

Observers noted that the bear appeared to suffer from depression in the weeks after his beloved keeper and constant companion died.

Experts had earlier warned that the Knut was developing into a ‘psychopath’ who was too dependent on human contact.

In 2009 Knut was the subject of a bitter custody battle between two zoos. Neumunster Zoo had loaned Berlin Zoo Knut’s father Lars in 1999 on the condition that the first-born cub from his union with mother Tosca would belong to Neumunster.

And last year Knut’s cousin died after a mystery virus spread through the zoo’s bear enclosure.

Knut's fame grew to such an extent that he was featured on a set of stamps issued by the German Post Office

Knut’s fame grew to such an extent that he was featured on a set of stamps issued by the German Post Office

Knut dead: German polar bear dies in front of 600 visitors at Berlin Zoo | Mail Online

March 19, 2011 Posted by | Animals, Blog, Blogroll, CELEBRITY, Death, Entertainement, nature | | Leave a comment

Knee-high fence to halt poisonous Australian toads


 

Knee-high fence to halt poisonous Australian toads

Australia’s popular Kimberley wilderness region has resorted to a long knee-high fence to keep out the poisonous cane toad, which is rapidly overrunning the tourist attraction.

Knee-high fence to halt poisonous Australian toads

Cane toad’s secrete a toxin that can kill pets and wildlife Photo: AFP/GETTY

A 1.25 mile barrier will be erected at Emma Gorge, made from cloth mesh to allow other animals to move through while keeping out the toads, prolific breeders which secrete a toxin that can kill pets and wildlife.

Stop the Toad Foundation campaign manager Kim Hands said hundreds of thousands of toads had penetrated the area, threatening native species.

"Experience in the past has been that it has been really efficient," she said of the fence.

The cane toad has spread widely in tropical Australia since being introduced to kill beetles in the 1930s, devouring insects, bird’s eggs and native species such as the quoll, a catlike marsupial.

But a recent investigation by the University of Melbourne showed that the toad – up to 10 inches long and 4.4 pounds in weight – has an Achilles’ heel

Knee-high fence to halt poisonous Australian toads – Telegraph

March 16, 2011 Posted by | Animals, Blog, Blogroll, Entertainement, Health, nature, Weird | | Leave a comment

Dalai Lama retires from political role at the helm of Tibet’s fight for freedom.


What a good man…..and yet a Country which is taking over the World it seems will not let him live at home with his people….I think there is something wrong very wrong with this.

Come on world say something about this…….

Dalai Lama retires from politics after over 60 years at helm of Tibet’s fight for freedom

Retirement: The Dalai Lama, pictured today, said that he was stepping down from politics after six decades

Retirement: The Dalai Lama, pictured today, said that he was stepping down from politics after six decades

The Dalai Lama is retiring from politics after more than six decades at the helm of Tibet’s fight for freedom from Chinese rule.

Speaking on the 52nd anniversary of the 1959 uprising against Chinese repression, the Tibetan spiritual leader and head of its exiled government said the time had come ‘to devolve my formal authority to the elected leader.’

The 75-year-old has long insisted that he wants the exile government, based in the Indian hill town of Dharamsala, to have more power.

He has also previously said he wants to give up his political roles.

Today, the spiritual leader laid down a timeline, saying he would propose amendments to the constitution during the parliament’s next session, which begins later this month.

Just how much change will come, though, is highly unclear. The Dalai Lama’s political role is largely ceremonial – an elected prime minister is the formal leader of the exile government.

But his personal status overshadows everyone else in the movement.

The Dalai Lama remains deeply revered by most Tibetans despite Beijing’s decades-long campaign to undermine his influence.

China regards him as a separatist intent on overthrowing Chinese rule in Tibet, but His Holiness has repeatedly said he simply wants more autonomy for the Tibetan people within China, calling on Beijing to ease its rule in Tibet and allow religious and cultural freedom.

‘Tibetans live in constant fear and anxiety,’ he said today, and added, ‘I express my solidarity with those who continue to suffer.

‘The ongoing oppression of the Tibetan people has provoked widespread, deep resentment against current official policies’, and he added, ‘China has huge potential to contribute to human progress and world peace, but to do that, they must earn the respect of the international community through more transparency… their actions corresponding to their words’.

He continued: ‘My desire to devolve authority has nothing to do with a wish to shirk responsibility. It is to benefit Tibetans in the long run. It is not because I feel disheartened.’

Samdhong Rinpoche, the current exiled prime minister later indicated that the political transition may not happen soon.

‘Despite His Holiness’ request, the people and the government do not feel competent to lead ourselves,’ he said, calling the transition ‘a long and difficult process’.

Boy Saint: The Dalai Lama as a young child in the 1930s, after he was recognised as the reincarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama at the age of two.

Boy Saint: The Dalai Lama as a young child in the 1930s, after he was recognised as the reincarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama at the age of two.

A life of exile: But the Dalai Lama said that his decision did not mean he was despondent about Tibet's struggle with China

A life of exile: But the Dalai Lama said that his decision did not mean he was despondent about Tibet’s struggle with China

Revered: Tibetan artists perform in front of the Dalai Lama during the commemoration

Revered: Tibetan artists perform in front of the Dalai Lama during the commemoration

Support: Hundreds gathered in the exiled Tibetan government's base in Dharamsala, India, to hear the spiritual leader mark the anniversary of the 1959 uprising

Support: Hundreds gathered in the exiled Tibetan government’s base in Dharamsala, India, to hear the spiritual leader mark the anniversary of the 1959 uprising

In the past, the parliament-in-exile has officially asked the Dalai Lama not to give up any of his powers.

News of the Dalai Lama’s retirement was treated with scepticism by the Communist government in Beijing.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Jiang Yu said: ‘He has often talked about retirement in the past few years. I think these are his tricks to deceive the international community.’

Dalai Lamas were traditionally both the political and spiritual leaders of Tibet, and the current Dalai Lama retains almost god-like status to most of his followers.

He is the 14th person to hold the title in a tradition stretching back 500 years, with each Dalai Lama chosen as a child by senior monks through a series of mystical signs.

Each is believed to be the reincarnation of his predecessor.

The current Dalai Lama has indicated his successor would come from the exile community.

Beijing, though, insists the reincarnation must be found in China’s Tibetan areas, giving the Communist authorities immense power over who is chosen.

Many observers believe there eventually will be rival Dalai Lamas – one appointed by Beijing, and one by senior monks loyal to the current Dalai Lama.

Srikanth Kondapalli, a professor of Chinese studies at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, said it was clear that succession worries were behind the announcement.

The Dalai Lama, he said, wants to create a stable political system that can hold the Tibetan community together on its own.

Speaking in 2010, the spiritual leader said he and his senior advisers regularly discussed his death and its affect on the Tibetan movement.

‘When I pass away, when I die, of course (there will be) a setback. Very serious setback. … But then, this younger generation will carry this on. There is no question,’ he said.

While Beijing claims Tibet has been part of Chinese territory for centuries, Tibet was a deeply isolated and feudal theocracy until 1951, when Chinese troops occupied its capital city, Lhasa.

Beijing’s rule has brought immense changes to Tibet, ranging from high-speed trains to modern universities, but Tibetans in exile say their unique culture and religion are on the verge of extinction under Chinese rule that has seen a massive influx of ethnic Han Chinese migrants.

Security appeared to have been ramped up Wednesday in Lhasa, with hotel staffers saying police were doing more street patrols. The anniversary of the uprising is a sensitive time in Tibet.

In 2008, unrest erupted in Lhasa and other Tibetan areas when monks tried to commemorate the 1959 revolt.

Protests: There were scuffles in the Nepalese capital Kathmandu as Dalai Lama supporters marked the annivesary

Protests: There were scuffles in the Nepalese capital Kathmandu as Dalai Lama supporters marked the annivesary

March: Buddhist monks were also out on the streets of Delhi to call for the liberation of Tibet

March: Buddhist monks were also out on the streets of Delhi to call for the liberation of Tibet

Six decades fighting for freedom

The Dalai Lama was born to a farming family in north east Tibet as Tenzin Gyatso.

A the age of two he was recognised as the reincarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama by senior Bhuddist clergy.

Bhuddists believe the Dalai Lamas are living saints, enlightnened beings who have postponed their own nirvana to save humanity.

Adolescence: The Dalai Lama as a young teenager - before he was called on to lead Tibet in the face of a Chinese invasion at the age of just 15

Adolescence: The Dalai Lama as a young teenager – before he was called on to lead Tibet in the face of a Chinese invasion at the age of just 15

Great responsibility: the Dalai Lama in 1950, when he was asked to take charge of the Tibetan state in the face of a Chinese invasion. He is wearing the crown of the Himalayan kingdom

Great responsibility: the Dalai Lama in 1950, when he was asked to take charge of the Tibetan state in the face of a Chinese invasion. He is wearing the crown of the Himalayan kingdom

The 14th Dalai Lama was called to assume full political power at the age of 15 after China invaded Tibet in 1949.

He sought peace with the invaders, holding peace talks with Mao Zedong in Beijing in 1954, but was unsuccesful.

The leader was finally forced to flee the country in 1959, when a national uprising in the capital Lhasa was brutally suppressed by Chinese troops.

His home since has been Dharamsala, in north India, where the exiled Tibetan parliament sits.

Fleeing his country: the Dalai Lama is interviewed as he arrives in India, where he will spend the rest of his life in exile

Fleeing his country: the Dalai Lama is interviewed as he arrives in India, where he will spend the rest of his life in exile

Touring the world: The Dalai Lama on his first visit to Britain in 1973. He is accompanied by Canon Stephen Verney of Windsor during a visit to Windsor Castle

Touring the world: The Dalai Lama on his first visit to Britain in 1973. He is accompanied by Canon Stephen Verney of Windsor during a visit to Windsor Castle

The Dalai Lama has presented a number of peace initiatives and plans to democratise Tibet.

In 1963, he presented a draft constitution to formalise the exiled Tibetan Parliament, which enshrined freedom of speech and beliefs.

He subsequently toured the world, promoting the Tibetan cause with world leaders .

In September 1987, he presented a five-point peace plan for Tibet. His plan called for Tibet to become a sanctuary and zone of peace at the heart of Asia where people live in harmony and the environment is respected.

It also called for China to halt its policy of transferring large numbers of native Chinese to Tibet, respect the human rights of Tibetans, stop using Tibet to produce nuclear weapons and dump radioactive waste, and start negotiations with the Tibetan parliament in exile.

Still campaigning: the Dalai Lama in 1998, almost a decade after the was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize

Still campaigning: the Dalai Lama in 1998, almost a decade after the was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize

He won the Nobel Peace Prize two years later in 1989 for consistently advocating noon-violence in the face of extreme aggression.

He continued campaigning for another 20 years, buts signs his health was failing started to emerge in 2008, when he cancelled two trips to undergo medical treatment.

Over his life he has received more than 80 awards, honorary doctorates and prizes and travelled to more than 60 countries to meet heads of state and religious leaders.

Dalai Lama retires from political role at the helm of Tibet’s fight for freedom | Mail Online

March 10, 2011 Posted by | Blog, Blogroll, CELEBRITY, Disgusting, Internet, Just Wrong, nature, People, Politics, religion | | Leave a comment

Baby’s Hysterical Laughter Becomes Web Sensation – Yahoo! Lifestyle UK


 

Baby’s hysterical laughter becomes web sensation

Add a little laughter to your day with giggling baby Micah who’s taken the web by storm.…

Posted By Yahoo Lifestyle, Wednesday, 2 March 2011 11:19 GMT

There’s nothing that warms the heart more than a laughing baby. Especially when they’re cackling hysterically as you rip up a job rejection letters.

Baby Micah’s contagious laughter has become a web hit, with the video receiving over 1.5 million views since it was posted in January. The 8-month-old’s laughing fit started when his dad, out-of-work professor Marcus McArthur, began ripping up rejection letters, which resulted in this two minutes video of his child’s manic laughter.

The video went viral when Charmed actress Alyssa Milano posted it on Twitter.

McArthur is still looking for work, and says his son’s newfound fame hasn’t brought him any job offers. 

“I have a feeling it will lead to more leads for Micah’s future employment.” McArthur told Fox News

And for those sceptical about whether the whole thing was staged, McArthur says he has his camera at the ready with Micah all day so that his wife, who is employed full time, doesn’t miss any ‘cuteness’.

Watch the adorable event unfold below. 

 http://uk.video.yahoo.com/watch/8765597/24384316

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March 2, 2011 Posted by | Blog, Blogroll, CELEBRITY, Entertainement, Funny, Health, Internet, People | | Leave a comment