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Dalai Lama retires from political role at the helm of Tibet’s fight for freedom.


What a good man…..and yet a Country which is taking over the World it seems will not let him live at home with his people….I think there is something wrong very wrong with this.

Come on world say something about this…….

Dalai Lama retires from politics after over 60 years at helm of Tibet’s fight for freedom

Retirement: The Dalai Lama, pictured today, said that he was stepping down from politics after six decades

Retirement: The Dalai Lama, pictured today, said that he was stepping down from politics after six decades

The Dalai Lama is retiring from politics after more than six decades at the helm of Tibet’s fight for freedom from Chinese rule.

Speaking on the 52nd anniversary of the 1959 uprising against Chinese repression, the Tibetan spiritual leader and head of its exiled government said the time had come ‘to devolve my formal authority to the elected leader.’

The 75-year-old has long insisted that he wants the exile government, based in the Indian hill town of Dharamsala, to have more power.

He has also previously said he wants to give up his political roles.

Today, the spiritual leader laid down a timeline, saying he would propose amendments to the constitution during the parliament’s next session, which begins later this month.

Just how much change will come, though, is highly unclear. The Dalai Lama’s political role is largely ceremonial – an elected prime minister is the formal leader of the exile government.

But his personal status overshadows everyone else in the movement.

The Dalai Lama remains deeply revered by most Tibetans despite Beijing’s decades-long campaign to undermine his influence.

China regards him as a separatist intent on overthrowing Chinese rule in Tibet, but His Holiness has repeatedly said he simply wants more autonomy for the Tibetan people within China, calling on Beijing to ease its rule in Tibet and allow religious and cultural freedom.

‘Tibetans live in constant fear and anxiety,’ he said today, and added, ‘I express my solidarity with those who continue to suffer.

‘The ongoing oppression of the Tibetan people has provoked widespread, deep resentment against current official policies’, and he added, ‘China has huge potential to contribute to human progress and world peace, but to do that, they must earn the respect of the international community through more transparency… their actions corresponding to their words’.

He continued: ‘My desire to devolve authority has nothing to do with a wish to shirk responsibility. It is to benefit Tibetans in the long run. It is not because I feel disheartened.’

Samdhong Rinpoche, the current exiled prime minister later indicated that the political transition may not happen soon.

‘Despite His Holiness’ request, the people and the government do not feel competent to lead ourselves,’ he said, calling the transition ‘a long and difficult process’.

Boy Saint: The Dalai Lama as a young child in the 1930s, after he was recognised as the reincarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama at the age of two.

Boy Saint: The Dalai Lama as a young child in the 1930s, after he was recognised as the reincarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama at the age of two.

A life of exile: But the Dalai Lama said that his decision did not mean he was despondent about Tibet's struggle with China

A life of exile: But the Dalai Lama said that his decision did not mean he was despondent about Tibet’s struggle with China

Revered: Tibetan artists perform in front of the Dalai Lama during the commemoration

Revered: Tibetan artists perform in front of the Dalai Lama during the commemoration

Support: Hundreds gathered in the exiled Tibetan government's base in Dharamsala, India, to hear the spiritual leader mark the anniversary of the 1959 uprising

Support: Hundreds gathered in the exiled Tibetan government’s base in Dharamsala, India, to hear the spiritual leader mark the anniversary of the 1959 uprising

In the past, the parliament-in-exile has officially asked the Dalai Lama not to give up any of his powers.

News of the Dalai Lama’s retirement was treated with scepticism by the Communist government in Beijing.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Jiang Yu said: ‘He has often talked about retirement in the past few years. I think these are his tricks to deceive the international community.’

Dalai Lamas were traditionally both the political and spiritual leaders of Tibet, and the current Dalai Lama retains almost god-like status to most of his followers.

He is the 14th person to hold the title in a tradition stretching back 500 years, with each Dalai Lama chosen as a child by senior monks through a series of mystical signs.

Each is believed to be the reincarnation of his predecessor.

The current Dalai Lama has indicated his successor would come from the exile community.

Beijing, though, insists the reincarnation must be found in China’s Tibetan areas, giving the Communist authorities immense power over who is chosen.

Many observers believe there eventually will be rival Dalai Lamas – one appointed by Beijing, and one by senior monks loyal to the current Dalai Lama.

Srikanth Kondapalli, a professor of Chinese studies at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, said it was clear that succession worries were behind the announcement.

The Dalai Lama, he said, wants to create a stable political system that can hold the Tibetan community together on its own.

Speaking in 2010, the spiritual leader said he and his senior advisers regularly discussed his death and its affect on the Tibetan movement.

‘When I pass away, when I die, of course (there will be) a setback. Very serious setback. … But then, this younger generation will carry this on. There is no question,’ he said.

While Beijing claims Tibet has been part of Chinese territory for centuries, Tibet was a deeply isolated and feudal theocracy until 1951, when Chinese troops occupied its capital city, Lhasa.

Beijing’s rule has brought immense changes to Tibet, ranging from high-speed trains to modern universities, but Tibetans in exile say their unique culture and religion are on the verge of extinction under Chinese rule that has seen a massive influx of ethnic Han Chinese migrants.

Security appeared to have been ramped up Wednesday in Lhasa, with hotel staffers saying police were doing more street patrols. The anniversary of the uprising is a sensitive time in Tibet.

In 2008, unrest erupted in Lhasa and other Tibetan areas when monks tried to commemorate the 1959 revolt.

Protests: There were scuffles in the Nepalese capital Kathmandu as Dalai Lama supporters marked the annivesary

Protests: There were scuffles in the Nepalese capital Kathmandu as Dalai Lama supporters marked the annivesary

March: Buddhist monks were also out on the streets of Delhi to call for the liberation of Tibet

March: Buddhist monks were also out on the streets of Delhi to call for the liberation of Tibet

Six decades fighting for freedom

The Dalai Lama was born to a farming family in north east Tibet as Tenzin Gyatso.

A the age of two he was recognised as the reincarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama by senior Bhuddist clergy.

Bhuddists believe the Dalai Lamas are living saints, enlightnened beings who have postponed their own nirvana to save humanity.

Adolescence: The Dalai Lama as a young teenager - before he was called on to lead Tibet in the face of a Chinese invasion at the age of just 15

Adolescence: The Dalai Lama as a young teenager – before he was called on to lead Tibet in the face of a Chinese invasion at the age of just 15

Great responsibility: the Dalai Lama in 1950, when he was asked to take charge of the Tibetan state in the face of a Chinese invasion. He is wearing the crown of the Himalayan kingdom

Great responsibility: the Dalai Lama in 1950, when he was asked to take charge of the Tibetan state in the face of a Chinese invasion. He is wearing the crown of the Himalayan kingdom

The 14th Dalai Lama was called to assume full political power at the age of 15 after China invaded Tibet in 1949.

He sought peace with the invaders, holding peace talks with Mao Zedong in Beijing in 1954, but was unsuccesful.

The leader was finally forced to flee the country in 1959, when a national uprising in the capital Lhasa was brutally suppressed by Chinese troops.

His home since has been Dharamsala, in north India, where the exiled Tibetan parliament sits.

Fleeing his country: the Dalai Lama is interviewed as he arrives in India, where he will spend the rest of his life in exile

Fleeing his country: the Dalai Lama is interviewed as he arrives in India, where he will spend the rest of his life in exile

Touring the world: The Dalai Lama on his first visit to Britain in 1973. He is accompanied by Canon Stephen Verney of Windsor during a visit to Windsor Castle

Touring the world: The Dalai Lama on his first visit to Britain in 1973. He is accompanied by Canon Stephen Verney of Windsor during a visit to Windsor Castle

The Dalai Lama has presented a number of peace initiatives and plans to democratise Tibet.

In 1963, he presented a draft constitution to formalise the exiled Tibetan Parliament, which enshrined freedom of speech and beliefs.

He subsequently toured the world, promoting the Tibetan cause with world leaders .

In September 1987, he presented a five-point peace plan for Tibet. His plan called for Tibet to become a sanctuary and zone of peace at the heart of Asia where people live in harmony and the environment is respected.

It also called for China to halt its policy of transferring large numbers of native Chinese to Tibet, respect the human rights of Tibetans, stop using Tibet to produce nuclear weapons and dump radioactive waste, and start negotiations with the Tibetan parliament in exile.

Still campaigning: the Dalai Lama in 1998, almost a decade after the was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize

Still campaigning: the Dalai Lama in 1998, almost a decade after the was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize

He won the Nobel Peace Prize two years later in 1989 for consistently advocating noon-violence in the face of extreme aggression.

He continued campaigning for another 20 years, buts signs his health was failing started to emerge in 2008, when he cancelled two trips to undergo medical treatment.

Over his life he has received more than 80 awards, honorary doctorates and prizes and travelled to more than 60 countries to meet heads of state and religious leaders.

Dalai Lama retires from political role at the helm of Tibet’s fight for freedom | Mail Online

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March 10, 2011 - Posted by | Blog, Blogroll, CELEBRITY, Disgusting, Internet, Just Wrong, nature, People, Politics, religion |

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